Celebrate Cerrado Mineiro Day

by

Editorial Policy

Published on

Last updated on

Photos courtesy of Cerrado Coffee Growers Federation

[F]riday, October 4, marks the very first “Cerrado Mineiro Day”, launched by the Cerrado Coffee Growers Federation, in partnership with Ally Coffee.

Beginning this year, the first Friday of October will celebrate coffee from the Região do Cerrado Mineiro, Brazil’s first and only Designation of Origin for coffee. The region’s Seal of Origin and Quality guarantees the origin and quality of its coffee lots, made possible by the Cerrado Coffee Growers Federation, the entity that promotes, controls, and represents the Cerrado Mineiro Region.

Coffee crops in the Cerrado Mineiro Region, Brazil.

On October 4, Ally Coffee, the Cerrado Coffee Growers Federation’s first accredited importer, will host cuppings and events around the world. Attendees will be able to learn more about the region, its coffee, and the Designation of Origin program, cup the new crop, and purchase the coffee.

All events are local time:

  • 4 p.m. at Ally Coffee—1801 Rutherford Road, Suite 112 Greenville, SC 29609
  • 1 p.m. at The Pulley Collective—2451 Peralta St, Oakland, CA 94607
  • 1 p.m. at Kaffelabbet—Landsvägsgatan 15, 413 04 Göteborg, Sweden
  • 3 p.m. at Open Coffee—Bolshaya Monetnaya 16, St. Petersburg, Russia
  • 3 p.m. at Coffee Workshop—Bolshaya Novodmitrovskaya Street, 36с6, Moscow, Russia
  • 3 p.m. at Röststätte Berlin—Ackerstraße 173, 10115 Berlin, Germany
  • 7 p.m. at Kaffa Roastery—Pursimiehenkatu 29, 00150 Helsinki, Finland

“Cerrado Mineiro Day, besides being a moment of celebration, is part of a strategy for integrating the coffee chain and uniting the links around the promotion of the Cerrado Mineiro Region, our coffees, our Designation of Origin, and our producers,” says Juliano Tarabal, superintendent of the Cerrado Coffee Growers Federation. “We want to invite people to experience our origin and to know about our coffees.”

Share This Article

Fresh Cup Staff

Join 7,000+ coffee pros and get top stories, deals, and other industry goodies in your inbox each week.

Other Articles You May Like

Can Liberica Change The Way We Grow Coffee?

Once cultivated in the 19th century to battle coffee leaf rust, liberica, a nearly forgotten coffee species—and its new subvariety, excelsa—may be the answer to the looming threat of climate change.
by Fionn Pooler | February 1, 2023

Good Genes: Genetic Diversity And The Future of Coffee

How the industry is looking to genetic resource conservation to help preserve coffee.
by Chris Ryan | January 12, 2023

New Names, Same Faces: Genetic Accuracy for Yemeni Coffee

In Yemen, coffee varieties are often referred to by colloquial names, which are often inaccurate and don’t reflect real varieties. But a new study is giving farmers more definitive names and greater access to…
by Valorie Clark | November 23, 2022

Contemporary Indonesian Specialty Coffee: A Chat with Three Coffee Processors

The world of Indonesian coffee has changed a lot over the past five years. Here are three coffee processors discussing the highlights and challenges of Indonesian coffee production.
by Mikey Rinaldo | November 11, 2022